Non-Profit Trusted Source of Non-Commercial Health Information
The Original Voice of the American Academy of Anti-Aging, Preventative, and Regenerative Medicine
logo logo
Mental Health Aging Behavior Brain and Mental Performance

What You Eat Can Affect Your Mood

1 week, 1 day ago

2002  0
Posted on Feb 15, 2018, 11 a.m.

An anonymous survey was conducted over the internet asking people from all around the world to participate by completing the Food-Mood Questionnaire. The questionnaire contained questions on food groups that have been associated with neurobiology and neurochemistry. In analyzing the data collected the team found that the mood in younger adults, in the age group of 18 to 29, seemed to be dependent on the food which increases the availability of neurotransmitter concentrations and precursors in the brain, such as meats. The mood in mature adults, over the age of 30, may be more reliant upon food that will increase the availability of antioxidants, such as fruits, and abstinence of the foods that will inappropriately activate the sympathetic nervous system, such as skipping breakfast, high glycemic index, and coffee.

An anonymous survey was conducted over the internet asking people from all around the world to participate by completing the Food-Mood Questionnaire. The questionnaire contained questions on food groups that have been associated with neurobiology and neurochemistry. In analyzing the data collected the team found that the mood in younger adults, in the age group of 18 to 29, seemed to be dependent on the food which increases the availability of neurotransmitter concentrations and precursors in the brain, such as meats. The mood in mature adults, over the age of 30, may be more reliant upon food that will increase the availability of antioxidants, such as fruits, and abstinence of the foods that will inappropriately activate the sympathetic nervous system, such as skipping breakfast, high glycemic index, and coffee.

 

Researchers suggest that the dietary practices and diet affect the mental health in young adults differently than in older adults, stating that younger adult moods appear to be more sensitive to the build up of brain chemicals. Regular consumption of meat contributes to the build up of 2, dopamine and serotonin, known to promote mood. Regular exercise contributes to the build of neurotransmitters and these brain chemicals as well. It was noted that younger adults who had consumed meat less than 3 times per week, and had exercised less than 3 times per week displayed significant mental distress. It was also noted that moods in mature adults were more sensitive to regular consumption of antioxidant sources and the abstinence of food stuffs that will inappropriately activate the fight or flight responses. In aging there comes an increase in free radical formation, increasing the need for antioxidants. Free radicals can cause disturbances in the brain which can increase mental distress. The ability to regulate stress decreases as we age, by consuming food that activates the stress response, such as too much carbohydrates and coffee, it makes it more likely to experience mental distress.

 

The team is interested in comparing the dietary intake between women and men in relation to mental distress. There is a gender difference between the sexes in brain morphology which may be sensitive to dietary components that may potentially explain some of the gender specific mental distress risks that have been documented.

 

The study was conducted by researchers at Binghamton University.

Materials provided by Binghamton University.

Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

 

Journal Reference:

Lina Begdache, Maher Chaar, Nasim Sabounchi, Hamed Kianmehr. Assessment of dietary factors, dietary practices and exercise on mental distress in young adults versus matured adults: A cross-sectional study. Nutritional Neuroscience, 2017; 1 DOI: 10.1080/1028415X.2017.1411875

  1.  

 

 

Subscribe to our Newsletter

WorldHealth Videos